Gynecomastia and BMI for Men

BMI chart for men to use when considering gyno surgery

Is Body Mass Index (BMI) Important for Gyno Surgery?

There are many ways for your doctor to measure how healthy you are. They will probably ask you how you’re feeling, and they may run tests to measure how well your body is working. When you’re considering gynecomastia surgery, there are many factors we consider to make sure this surgery is right for you. One thing we will look at is your Body Mass Index, or BMI.

What is BMI?

BMI is nothing more than a measure of your weight in relation to your height. Technically, it’s your weight in kilograms divided by your height in meters squared. Don’t worry, you don’t need to break out your calculator! You can easily find your BMI with an online calculator or with the BMI table below.

Truth be told, this is not a precise or perfect method to determine your physical health or body fat percentage, but it is generally an excellent all-purpose guideline that is very helpful, if not life-changing for many. At the Austin Gynecomastia Center, BMI is an important measure when considering gynecomastia surgery.

BMI table for men to use when considering gynecomastia surgery
BMI Chart for Men

BMI and Bodybuilders

Weightlifters and bodybuilders are often misrepresented by BMI. The problem is, the weight measurement can’t tell the difference between fat and muscle. Compared to an average person, someone with impressive muscles will have a much higher BMI. Fortunately, I’ve worked with many bodybuilders who are interested in correcting their gynecomastia. My free online consultation asks you to include photos, and I’ll be able to tell right away if the gyno surgery is right for you.

Why BMI is Important for Gyno Treatment

Knowledge is power. The benefit of a BMI analysis for gynecomastia treatment is that it lets you know where you are on the scale so you can use this information to your advantage. The benefits of keeping your weight in the ideal range include better health and looking more attractive. When it comes to gynecomastia surgery, a healthy BMI is key to obtaining better results with less risk.

There are simply no downsides to being in your ideal BMI for men — it is a goal we all work toward our entire lives! I typically won’t offer my gynecomastia treatment services to those patients who are well outside their BMI because of increased risk and compromised results. Plastic surgery to treat gynecomastia is elective and it is not a life-saving treatment for a disease or condition. It can wait until better circumstances exist. It is the responsible thing to do.

My popular Online Consultation form requires patients to submit information so I can make an appropriate analysis and recommendation. The most common reasons why I hesitate to offer gynecomastia surgery is because patients are well outside their BMI or they have underlying health issues that increase the treatment risk profile and compromise their results significantly. There is such a thing as the “best time” for gynecomastia surgery, but we can give you the best opportunity for success.

Can I Get Gyno Surgery if I’m Overweight?

We all care about our appearance, and part of improving how other people see you may be gynecomastia treatment. If you are overweight and considering gyno surgery, you’re probably wondering if now is the right time. The honest answer might not be “no,” but it might be “not yet.”

Patients need to avoid being skeptical or making excuses about their BMI. As I said, it is not a perfect calculation, but it is very useful. The first step in managing a weight problem is to admit you have one, and that’s why BMI is critical. It is often the first time overweight patients realized how far they are outside of their healthy weight.

How to Lower Your BMI

A big problem with our medical establishment is that we often don’t discuss this difficult issue with our patients, nor do we offer much by way of solutions to the problem. People are often confused and overwhelmed by the information on the Internet regarding weight loss. My best advice is to start by picking a weight number that is ideal and then use common sense methods like eating healthy, eating less, and make exercise a part of your life – it’s actually that “simple” in concept but more challenging in reality. If your BMI was a shocker for you, this is the time to make a change for the better.

Robert Caridi, MD
Diplomate of the American Board of Plastic Surgery
Fellow of the American College of Surgeons (FACS)
Member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS)
Member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery
Founder of the Austin Gynecomastia Center